Democratic vs Non Democratic Essay

Democratic vs Non Democratic EssaySchool of Arts and Sciences and Business History and Political Science Department POL101 Introduction to Politics Spring Semester, 2020 Joule™ Access (add course link here) 2 Instructor: Dr. David Hoovler Office: 408 Gibbons Hall Phone: 410-532-5373 E-Mail: dhoovler@ndm.edu Course Title: Introduction to Politics Course Number: POL101 Course Credits: 3 When and Where: MWF, 11:00-11:50, Gibbons 314 Prerequisites: None, except a conscientious desire to learn. General Education: Meets Social Science and Cross Cultural Requirements Refelections: “If a nation expects to be ignorant and free…it expects what never was or never will be.” Thomas Jefferson “The less people know about how sausages and laws are made, the better they’ll sleep at night.” Otto von Bismarck “Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.” Mark Twain “Just because you don’t take an interest in politics doesn’t mean politics won’t take an interest in you.” Pericles “The job of a good citizen is to keep his mouth open.” Gunter Grass “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” Martin Luther Kin 3 COURSE DESCRIPTION: • • • • • How are democracies different from non-democracies? What is necessary for a democracy to work effectively and fairly? What are the major elements of all political systems? What are major perspectives regarding the environment and the role of women? How is nationalism related to war? This course addresses these and other key questions. It gives a context to better understand the political processes in the United States and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this introductory course. It meets the general education requirement for social science and cross cultural studies. It is also a required course in the Political Science and Law and Civic Engagement majors. The course is divided into three roughly equal sections each followed by an analytical paper based on course materials. Part 1 analyzes major democratic and nom-democratic political ideologies and systems. It discusses the major elements of direct and representative democracies. Part 1 also focuses on non-democratic political systems (i.e., authoritarian and totalitarian). It analyzes left wing anticapitalist revolutionary ideologies (e.g., communism) as well as totalitarian right political regimes (i.e., status quo or nationalism based ideologies including Nazism). The primary emphasis is the differences between democratic and non-democratic systems. Part 2 analyzes the political elements and processes that characterize all modern political systems. This includes political cultures, elections, parties, legislatures, executive systems, and courts. We will discuss their roles and functions primarily in democracies. Part 3 focuses on political ideologies in general as well as specific ideologies (nationalism, feminism, environmentalism). In this section we are interested in the basic types and uses of political ideologies. We will also discuss historical international systems, possible emerging international systems, and peace strategies. There are a number of underlying beliefs that guide the direction of the course. It is believed that your learning is most optimal when: a). it is active and experiential entailing practice opportunities to apply course material by giving examples and discussing the significance of key concepts. b). it is seen as personal. The greater the opportunity to personalize and contextualize the material the more salient it will become. c). it is cathartic/catalytic and it transforms the learner. The learning change would include cognitive (thinking, ideas, beliefs), affective (feelings, values), and evaluative (judgment, discernment) components. 4 Research indicates learning is most optimal when the student mindfully and actively engages the material numerous times throughout the week. You are expected to read actively, take notes on the reading, mindfully do the assigned homework, and conscientiously study for class discussion and the analytical papers. A minimum of two hours out of class study for every hour in class is the usual rule of thumb. REQUIRED MATERIALS: • Roskin, Michael, et al., Political Science: An Introduction (14thEd.)Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2017. http://www.mypoliscilab.com • Heywood, Andrew, Political Ideologies: An Introduction, 6th ed. Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. • Other materials on Joule. Bibliography: Roskin et al. and Heywood provide very useful bibliographic references. For other references please see the instructor. LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES—in this course you will learn to: 1. Understand the types and functions of political ideologies. 2. Understand the major prerequisites, characteristics and types, of democracies and assess democracies in theory and practice. 3. Understand and assess the major components of capitalist theory as well as the similarities and differences between democratic capitalist and democratic socialist societies. 4. Understand interrelationships between government/politics and economics and especially democracy and economics. 5. Understand and compare and contrast the major elements of democratic and nondemocratic regimes. 6. Assess the major elements of communism in theory and practice as well as the major reasons for the demise of communism. 7. Understand and assess the major aspects of Fascism/Nazism. 5 8. Understand and assess the role and function of political culture/public opinion, elections, and parties in democratic and non-democratic systems. 9. Understand and assess the role and function of executives/bureaucracies, legislatures, and courts in democracies and non-democracies. 10. Understand and assess nationalism and its relationship to cooperation and conflict. 11. Understand and assess feminist theories and concepts. Understand the factors involved in women’s participation. 12. Understand and assess major environmental problems, theories, and concepts. 13. Understand and assess the current and possible future international systems. Department and General Education Objectives 1. Use informed evidence and logical manner to advance and support an argument*** 2. Recognize and interpret multiple forms of evidence.* 3. Distinguish between fact and interpretation role interpretation of interpretation and multiple causation in historical analysis.*** 4. Articulate an awareness of the interdependency of other cultures and the effects of foreign policies on them.* 5. Demonstrate understanding of the foreign policies of other cultures as reflected in their history, values, beliefs and practices.* *General education Objectives ** Departmental Major Objectives METHODS OF INSTRUCTION: 1. Lecture 2. Discussion 6 As your instructor in this course and your guide to this area of inquiry, I commit to the following: 1. Arrive on time for all classes prepared to create the best learning environment in which I am capable of providing. 2. Help the class and individual students to do their very best in this course by being available in class and outside of class (e- mail, meetings) to help them. 3. Evaluating students conscientiously, fairly and objectively. EXPECTATIONS /ASSIGNMENTS/GRADING POLICIES: ➢ I expect you to: 1. Be a conscientious, highly motivated learner, who can effectively schedule your time and for whom learning in general and this class in particular is a high priority. 2. Commit to coming on time and attending every class. 3. Read and take notes on course readings by the assigned dates. 4. Mindfully complete and turn in homework assignments at the beginning of class on the due date. 5. Be responsible for being prepared for each and every class. You are expected to demonstrate that you have done the reading by your comments and questions in class. 6. Bring the course readings and your notes on them to class. Be prepared to discuss them, do not wait to be called on and ask questions if you are confused. Be prepared to volunteer addressing the questions the instructor raises. 7. Do the homework assignments mindfully and turn them in on time. 8. Take succinct yet detailed handwritten notes during class discussion/lecture. • https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/05/16/why-smartkids-shouldnt-use-laptops-in-class/ • https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/05/13/allowing-devicesclassroom-hurts-academic-performance-study-finds 9. Contact me by telephone (410-532-5373) or e-mail (dhoovler@ndm.edu), keep up with the reading, complete assignments, and get class notes from a classmate if it is necessary that you miss a class. 10. Turn in the assessment papers at the date and time when they are due. 7 HONOR CODE / ACADEMIC INTEGRITY ISSUES: The honor code is a commitment to truth. It involves acting with integrity, honesty, and transparency in your relations with me and others. I expect you to be trustworthy. You are to write on your examinations: “I hereby affirm that I have neither given nor received unfair help on this exam…” (signature) Cheating is a violation of the Honor Code and it will result in failure for the course. By enrolling at Notre Dame of Maryland University, every student accepts and is bound by the Honor Code. The Honor Code is based on respect for the individual, personal responsibility, and honesty. It requires students, faculty, staff and administrators to uphold Honor Board procedures, including the reporting of violations. The Honor Code expects academic honesty, and assumes that any work students submit is their own. A full discussion of the Honor Code and an explanation about potential sanctions for violation is found in the current NDMU NDMU Classroom Technology Use NDMU embraces appropriate technology use as a means to facilitate student learning and recognizes that it is the responsibility of faculty and preceptors to set and enforce expectations regarding the use of technology in their class, laboratory or experiential site. Students may use computers, smart phones, and similar devices in the classroom only if they support teaching and learning activities. Other activities that distract students and prohibit them from fully participating in classroom learning and group work such as accessing social media sites, “surfing” the web, shopping, viewing videos, listening to music, text messaging, e-mailing, gaming and similar off-task behaviors are not permitted. In addition, all electronic devices must be in the “silent mode” and cell phones, pagers, and text messages should not be answered during class time. • https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/05/13/allowing-devicesclassroom-hurts-academic-performance-study-finds Students should be aware that expectations for appropriate technology use can change based on the unique needs of specific teaching and learning experiences and that they should seek clarification from the instructor if there is any confusion. Violation of NDMU Classroom Technology Use policy is a violation of NDMU honor code policy. Ensuring compliance with these policies is ultimately a shared responsibility between students and faculty. Student Responsibilities Joule & e-mail (Every course has a Joule course management site, and a minimum of a syllabus and any relevant course documents (assignments, readings, etc.) must be posted there. Specific instructions for Joule use in your course may be added here)  Students must check their ndm.edu email every day for additional announcements, assignments etc. 8  Students must use email account provided through Notre Dame of Maryland University for all course correspondence  Students must be aware of all due dates for assignments.  If student is absent from class, (see attendance policy), student is responsible for obtaining all course handouts. Handouts will be posted on Joule unless otherwise noted. Policy for Audio Recording in Classrooms Notre Dame of Maryland University NDMU students may not use recording devices in the classroom without explicit prior permission of the instructor. Instructor permission is not required when the instructor has received an accommodation notification from Disability Services that identifies a student who requires the use of a recording device. However, the instructor may prohibit the use of any recording device when it would inhibit free discussion and free exchange of ideas in the classroom. No recording of any type shall be posted on any social media site. Use of material is restricted to NDMU students. LEARNING DIFFERENCES/ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES: Accessibility services and accommodations are available to students in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you require accommodations in this course, you are strongly encouraged to contact the Director of Accessibility and Health Promotion at 410-532-5401 who will meet with you, review the documentation of your disability or medical condition, and discuss the services offered and any accommodations you seek for specific courses. It is extremely important that you begin this process at the beginning of the semester as accommodations are not retroactive; please do not wait until the first test or paper. Please note that it is the student’s responsibility to share any determined arrangements or accommodation plan with the course instructor as soon as possible within the semester to assist in your success. The University also recognizes that students who are experiencing temporary medical conditions may also require accommodations. Students who are pregnant, nursing, or those with other temporary medical conditions should also contact the Office of Accessibility and Health Promotion to discuss any accommodations requests. • • The accommodation process should be one of collaboration between student and instructor with support from the Office of Accessibility and Health Promotion. Students already working with the Office of Accessibility and Health Promotion have provided the office with documentation of their disability or medical condition. Students will present professors with a DSS letter which outlines required and approved accommodations. 9 COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Class participation is an important means of assessing the attainment of the above objectives. Twenty percent (20%) of the final grade will be attributable to class participation. It is important that you demonstrate that you have read and understood the course readings by the assigned due dates. I will assess the fidelity of the attendance as well as your ability to clearly and accurately discuss course materials on a consistent basis. Homework assessment will also be a very important part of the class participation grade. The homework assignments need to be done conscientiously and turned in on time. There will be three papers and they will cover the three areas of the course: 1) democratic and nondemocratic systems, 2) political processes and 3) nationalist, ecological, and feminist ideologies. The first two papers will account for 25% of the course grade. See Appendix B and C. The first paper will be assessment of democracies and nod democracies. The second paper will assess the role of the executive and the people in political systems. The final paper will also be a take home examination. It will account for thirty percent (30%) of the final evaluation. The final paper will assess your understanding of nationalism, environmentalism, and feminism. See Appendix D. Your essays need to indicate a direct, clear, specific, accurate, and well-organized understanding of the course material including major theories and concepts. See Appendix A. I expect the papersto be turned in on time. A summary of the relative weights of each course component follows: • Class participation/Homework 20% • Paper #1 25% • Paper #2 25% • Final Paper 30% The grading scale is a follows: 90-100=A, 87-89=B+, 80-86=B, 77-79=C+. 70-76=C, 6769=D+, 60-66=D, 0-59=F. You may find the following websites useful for enhancing your study and test taking skills: • www.studygs.net www.testtakingtips.com/ Careers If you would like to discuss careers in politics or international relations see me. For information about careers in political science also see: • http://www.worldwidelearn.com/online-education-guide/social-science/politicalscience-major.htm • http://www.payscale.com/best-colleges/jobs-for-political-science-majors.asp • http://www.apsanet.org • Finding a Career: “Solutionaries” (Google) 10 EMERGENCY CLOSURE PROCEDURES In the case of severe weather or other emergency, the campus might be closed and classes cancelled. Information regarding closings, cancellations, and the re-opening of campus is available from several sources. Students should check the University’s Web site (www.ndm.edu) or call 410-532-5151. In addition, a voice mail message will be sent to all campus phone extensions if there is a change in the University’s opening status. Students should also sign up for the University’s text notification system, which sends messages to registered text-message-capable cell phones, and e-mail addresses. Register for this service at: http://www.ndm.edu/public-safety/e2campus OUTLINE OF TOPICS/ASSIGNMENTS: Democratic and Non-Democratic Political Systems Jan. 23-W: Introduction Jan. 25-F: Politics and Political Science • Roskin, Ch. 1 (1-22) • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5acncv3KrY8&feature=share note taking 2 min • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHgjz_IM8Io Note taking-9 • https://www.inc.com/ari-zoldan/want-to-remember-notes-you-takeheres-why-you-need-to-write-them-by-hand.html Jan. 28-M: Political Ideologies • Heywood, Ch. 1. Jan. 30-W: Political Ideologies • Roskin, Ch. 2 (28-38) • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bnh_USI3vxg Ideologies (8 min) • https://www.ted.com/talks/richard_st_john_s_8_secrets_of_succes St. Johns, “Eight Secrets of Success” (3:13) Feb. 1-F: Political Ideologies • Roskin, Ch. 2 (38-48); pp. 22-26. • Roskin, Ch. 5 (pp. 49-53) 11 Feb. 4-M: Democracy • Heywood, Ch. 2 (pp. 24-45). • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbN9kx6YHQQ&feature=share History of Democracy in 4 minutes • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8xNBgCArE4&feature=share US political history 3 min • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4quK60FUvkY&feature=share Presidential vs Parliamentary 6 min Feb. 6-W: Capitalism and Democracy • Heywood, Ch. 2 (pp. 46-61). • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIuaW9YWqEU&feature=share Capitalism history 6 min. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UmowwMivyU&feature=share How privileged are you? 6 min…*** • https://finance.yahoo.com/news/will-i-be-rich-162733799.html Feb. 8-F : Democratic Socialism • Heywood, Ch 4 (97-114, 123-135) (Pages on Communism pp 114-123 later) Feb. 11-M: Political Economy in Democratic Capitalist and Democratic Socialist Countries • Roskin, Ch. 16; pp. 64-65. Feb. 13-W: US Political and Economy Trends • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pF-Tdsvk0tI&feature=share Decline of democracy 6 min • https://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/noam-chomsky-wants-youwake-american-dream#.VtOp38RO4P0.facebook 12 principles of oligarchy…how democracies become oligarchies • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6a87L_f7js&feature=share Decline of American Democracy 2:30 • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YU9djt_CQM&feature=share US Authoritarianism Trump 6 min • https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/08/how-democraciesdie-by-steven-levitsky-and-daniel-ziblatt-review http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20180107-what-its-like-to-live-in-awell-governed-country?ocid=twtvl • https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jan/08/how-democraciesdie-by-steven-levitsky-and-daniel-ziblatt-review • Gratitude: “Voted the Best E-mail of the Year” (Joule) � …