Does the “common man” still have a legitimate place in the American political system?

Does the “common man” still have a legitimate place in the American political system? Is it proper that a “street person’s” vote can nullify the vote of someone with a college degree, who performs civic work, and pays thousands of tax dollars every year? Or, is this “universal” voting practice no longer valid in the 21st century?

Discussion # 9:

In his article, “Slavery as a Positive Good (see Unit 2 for link),” planter George Fitzhugh discusses the merits of slavery. Why do you think Fitzhugh–and other southerners like him–felt the need to say/write such things? How is this view of slavery and slaves different than the slavery and indentured servanthood of the 17th and 18th centuries?

Discussion # 10:

Why do you suppose there was not more interest (even among women) for women’s suffrage (voting rights) in the 1830s and 1840s?

Discussion # 11:

Has the U.S. gotten over its sense of “Manifest Destiny,” or is the impulse just as strong today as it was in the mid -1800s? Do we still want to spread our culture and ideas to other nations? Give examples.

Discussion # 12:

Was the Civil War avoidable? If so, what could the North or the South (or both) have done to prevent this tragedy from occurring?