English Task- Book and Film Study

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English Task- Book and Film Study

Curious Incident of the dog in the night time (Book) 

Slumdog Millionaire (Film)

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20150427074019english_task__book_and_film_study_tasks_and_essasys.doc

SEND        PART    1: Create your own mind map
Create your mind map! Try to include the following key points in your drawing and then branch off any random thoughts that come into your head. Try starting off with the symbol of Wellington in the middle of the page or another symbol of significance from the novel.

Your mind map must include:
•    References to at least three characters.
•    At least four major ideas (themes) found in the novel.
•    Branching off these main ideas will be references to significant incidents from the novel and what the writer did to make these events meaningful for the reader. In other words, what did Mark Haddon do with language (words) to convey what these happenings meant and how important they were?
•    With each piece of information on the mind map, include a direct quote and a short explanation of what the quote demonstrates.
•    The mind map should also reveal what aspects (parts) of the text make it distinctive or unique (stand out from other novels).
•    The mind map must include visuals to clarify meaning (font size, colour coding, symbols, and other visuals).
Examining the topic

Your first graded task will be prepared this week.You will be writing an extended text response which asks you to discuss a key aspect of the text.
A draft of your extended response will be submitted for teacher feedback in Week 5. You will then revise and edit your draft after receiving your teacher’s feedback and submit a polished copy for assessment in Week 6.
Here are the steps involved in preparing this graded task for assessment:
1.    Working out what the topic is asking you
2.    Exploring how you feel about the information in the topic and jotting down some thoughts to help you clarify whether you agree or disagree
3.    Creating a plan using the TEEL structure
4.    Writing a draft of your extended response and submitting it to your teacher for feedback
5.    Receiving feedback from your teacher and using this to revise and edit your writing
6.    Submitting your final polished piece of writing to your teacher for assessment
Let’s examine the first two.

Dissecting the topic

We will examine the essay question on which you’ll be writing. We will then explore how to identify the key ideas within it, and how to clarify your thoughts about the topic.
Here is the essay topic:
“Christopher believes in obeying rules and always telling the truth. Sometimes this is a help and sometimes this is a hindrance.”
Do you agree?
What is the topic saying and what is it asking us to do? In order to understand this we need to closely read both parts of the topic – the quote and the question – and work out what each part of the topic is telling us.
The quote has two parts; two sentences which convey information about Christopher and about a key theme in the text.
The first of these is a fact:
Christopher believes in obeying rules and always telling the truth.
For the most part, we can’t do anything but accept this, because he does indeed believe in obeying rules and telling the truth, and holds others to this standard. What we can say is that Christopher will also tell as much of the truth as will serve his purpose…remember his conversation with his father about Mr Shears, and the reply he gave to his father in chapter 79? This shows us that Christopher obeys the rules and tells the truth but willsometimes try a different strategy in order to get what he wants. What, for example, is his stance on ‘white lies’?
The second statement provides an opportunity for you to form an opinion:
Sometimes this is a help and sometimes this is a hindrance.
Here, we need to make sure we understand the vocabulary in the statement. While we know what ‘help’ implies, what is a ‘hindrance’? This is where using a dictionary to check definitions, such as http://www.dictionary.reference.com/, can be useful.
If we check this site we learn that a hindrance is something which obstructs, blocks, stops or impedes our ability to act or achieve.
Do Christopher’s beliefs about rules and truth extend to other people? When people do obey the rules and tell the truth Christopher feels secure. When they do not, he feels confused and needs to use the coping strategies. There are many examples of this throughout the text.
For example, Christopher discovers certain things, and these might seem to be both a help and a hindrance:
Help    Hindrance
Truth about his mother    Has the book taken away
What happened to Wellington    His relationship with his dad starts to fracture

Now that we have this information, we can start thinking about writing the topic in a way that uses our own language and vocabulary – we can rewrite it and check our understanding. It might look like this:
Christopher always obeys rules and tells the truth. This behaviour has consequences. Sometimes it helps him to achieve what he would like to,but sometimes it provides a bit of a challenge for him.
Once we have done that, we can start thinking about how we will respond to the topic:
Working out how you feel about the topic

The final part of the topic is the actual question to which you’ll respond. In this case it is:
Do you agree?
Sometimes, using a diagram or flowchart may help to sort out how you are feeling about the topic. Once you have done this, you will be able to structure a response which conveys your unique feelings about the topic and the text. This diagram might be helpful to you at this stage of the process:

It might then be helpful to write out a brief statement containing the information in the diagram. This will help you clarify your thoughts and work out which textual evidence you might use in your essay.

Remember, the steps to prepare for an extended text response include:
1.    Working out what the topic is asking you
2.    Exploring how you feel about the information in the topic and jotting down some thoughts to help you clarify whether you agree or disagree
3.    Creating a plan using the TEEL structure
4.    Writing a draft of your extended response and submitting it to your teacher for feedback
5.    Receiving feedback from your teacher and using this to revise and edit your writing
6.    Submitting your final polished piece of writing to your teacher for assessment

Before we move onto looking at the TEEL extended response structure which is step 3 in the list above, let’s take a look at some visual representations of the elements you will need to remember.
‘Writing an essay’ diagrams
To help you think about the process you will need to undertake before and during your writing we have decided to include some diagrams about essay writing. You may find them useful.
They are visual representations of things you need to remember.
These may inspire you to create your own diagrams that relate more directly to the way you approach essay writing process. Remember, there are always key and essential elements, as shown below.

The ‘TEEL’ paragraph planning structure
All extended responses contain an introduction, a main body and a conclusion. The TEEL structure is very useful because it helps you to order the information you wish to include in each paragraph of the body of your extended response.
TEEL stands for:
T    Topic sentence – what is the main point of your paragraph about?
E    Explore / Explain – provide more information about the point you wish to make
E    Evidence – provide evidence from the text to support your point
L    Link – link your paragraph back to the topic

Using the TEEL structure to plan and write the body paragraphs within your extended response will help you to keep your writing focused on the topic. It will help you avoid certain traps, such as retelling the story; going off on a tangent; including personal information or writing about another theme of the text altogether.
It is highly recommended that you use the TEEL structure to plan your extended written pieces.

You can see from the sample essay planning document on the next page that the introduction and conclusion of your essay also have particular requirements.

The TEEL structure resource

Structure    Content    Your Plan: Use this section to plan your response step-by-step
Introduction
(paragraph 1)        Introduce the title of the text and the full name of the author in the first sentence
    Include very brief background information on the text
    Address the topic and outline the main points that you will use to support your opinion on the topic
Body
(Paragraphs  2, 3 and 4)