FACILITATE THE EMPOWERMENT OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY

U N I T I N T R O D U C T I O N

This resource covers the unit CHCDIS007 – Facilitate the empowerment of people with disability.

 

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to facilitate the empowerment of people with disability to deliver rights based services using a person-centred approach. It should be carried out in conjunction with individualised plans.

 

This unit applies to workers in varied disability contexts.

 

The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

 

ABOUT THIS RESOURCE

This resource brings together information to develop your knowledge about this unit. The information is designed to reflect the requirements of the unit and uses headings to makes it easier to follow.

 

Read through this resource to develop your knowledge in preparation for your assessment. You will be required to complete the assessment tools that are included in your program. At the back of the resource are a list of references you may find useful to review.

 

As a student it is important to extend your learning and to search out text books, internet sites, talk to people at work and read newspaper articles and journals which can provide additional learning material.

 

Your trainer may include additional information and provide activities. Slide presentations and assessments in class to support your learning.

 

 

 

 

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ABOUT ASSESSMENT

Throughout your training we are committed to your learning by providing a training and assessment framework that ensures the knowledge gained through training is translated into practical on the job improvements.

 

You are going to be assessed for:

 Your skills and knowledge using written and observation activities that apply

to your workplace.

 Your ability to apply your learning.

 Your ability to recognise common principles and actively use these on the job.

 

You will receive an overall result of Competent or Not Yet Competent for the assessment of this unit. The assessment is a competency based assessment, which has no pass or fail. You are either competent or not yet competent. Not Yet Competent means that you still are in the process of understanding and acquiring the skills and knowledge required to be marked competent. The assessment process is made up of a number of assessment methods. You are required to achieve a satisfactory result in each of these to be deemed competent overall.

 

All of your assessment and training is provided as a positive learning tool. Your assessor will guide your learning and provide feedback on your responses to the assessment. For valid and reliable assessment of this unit, a range of assessment methods will be used to assess practical skills and knowledge.

 

Your assessment may be conducted through a combination of the following methods:

 Written Activity

 Case Study

 Observation

 Questions

 Third Party Report

 

The assessment tool for this unit should be completed within the specified time period following the delivery of the unit. If you feel you are not yet ready for assessment, discuss this with your trainer and assessor.

 

 

 

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To be successful in this unit you will need to relate your learning to your workplace. You may be required to demonstrate your skills and be observed by your assessor in your workplace environment. Some units provide for a simulated work environment and your trainer and assessor will outline the requirements in these instances.

 

 

 

 

 

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E L E M E N T S A N D P E R F O R M A NC E C R I T E R I A

1. Demonstrate commitment to empowerment for people with disability

1.1 Identify changes in the legal, political and social frameworks within which the work is undertaken

1.2 Identify ways society can affect the level of impairment experienced by a person with disability

1.3 Reflect on personal values and attitudes regarding disability and acknowledge their potential impact when working in disability contexts

1.4 Develop and adjust own approaches to facilitate empowerment

2. Foster human rights 2.1 Assist the person with disability to understand their rights

2.2 Deliver services that ensure the rights and needs of the person are upheld in the context of person- centeredness

2.3 Ensure the cultural needs of the person are identified, accepted and upheld

2.4 Identify breaches of human rights and respond and report according to organisation procedures

2.5 Identify indications of possible abuse and/or neglect and report according to organisation procedure

3. Facilitate choice and self- determination

3.1 Using a person-centred approach work in a manner that acknowledges the person with disability as their own expert

3.2 Facilitate person-centred options for action on relevant issues and discuss with the person and/or family and/or carer and/or relevant other

3.3 Provide assistance to the person with disability to facilitate communication of their personal goals

3.4 Provide person-centred support in a manner that encourages and empowers the person with disability to make their own choices

 

 

 

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3.5 Assist with strategies to ensure that the person is comfortable with any decisions that are being made on their behalf

3.6 Assist with accessing advocacy services and other complaint mechanisms as required

 

 

 

 

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R E Q U I R E D S K I L L S A N D K N O W L E D G E

This describes the essential knowledge and skills and their level required for this unit.

 

The candidate must be able to demonstrate essential knowledge required to effectively manage tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit, manage tasks and manage contingencies in the context of the work role. This includes knowledge of:

 History and recent developments in disability

 Social versus medical model of service

 Institutionalised versus person-centred, self-directed model of support

 Social constructs of disability and the impact of own attitudes on working

with people with disabilities

 How and when to seek support from more experienced and qualified staff

 Types of disability, including:

 Acquired brain injury

 Autism spectrum disorder

 Cognitive disability

 Developmental delay

 Intellectual disability

 Neurological impairment

 Physical disability

 Sensory disability, including hearing, vision impairment

 Speech/language disability

 Support practices for people, including but not limited to, the following

conditions:

 Genetic factors

 Physical trauma

 Psychological trauma

 Chronic lifestyle conditions

 Acquired brain injury

 Legal and ethical considerations for working with people with disability:

 Codes of conduct

 

 

 

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 Discrimination

 Dignity of risk

 Duty of care

 Human rights, including the United Nations convention on the rights of

persons with disabilities (UNCRPD)

 Informed consent

 Mandatory reporting

 Privacy, confidentiality and disclosure

 Work role boundaries – responsibilities and limitations

 Work health and safety

 Principles of:

 Empowerment

 Rights-based approaches

 Person-centred practices

 Self-advocacy

 Active support

 Active listening

 Social justice and the importance of knowing and respecting each person as

an individual

 Strengths-based approaches

 Strategies that assist people with disabilities to exercise their rights and

support independent action and thinking, including use of technology (e.g.

laptops or tablets) to facilitate choice

 How to access and use advocacy services and complaint mechanisms

 Indicators of abuse and/or neglect in relation to people with disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

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A S S E S S M E N T C O N D I T I O N S

Skills must have been demonstrated in the disabilities workplace with the addition of simulations and scenarios where the full range of contexts and situations have not been provided in the workplace. These are situations relating to emergency or unplanned procedures where assessment in these circumstances would be unsafe, impractical or threatens the dignity of the person with disability.

 

The following conditions must be met for this unit:

 access to individualised plans and any equipment outlined in the plan

 

Overall, assessment must involve real interactions with people with disability, their families/carers/relevant others and the person’s individualised plan.

 

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015/AQTF mandatory competency requirements for assessors.

 

 

P R E – R E Q U I S I T E S

This unit must be assessed after the following pre-requisite unit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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T O P I C 1 – D E M O N S T R A T E C O M M I T M E N T T O E M P O W E R M E N T

F O R P E O P L E W I T H D I S A B I L I T Y

IDENTIFY CHANGES IN THE LEGAL, POLITICAL AND SOCIAL FRAMEWORKS WITHIN WHICH THE WORK IS UNDERTAKEN

The ways in which Disabilities have been viewed socially, legally and politically have changed in some fundamental ways in recent years. The Framework in which modern work in the field is conducted is vastly different from its origins.

 

TRADITIONAL MODEL

The traditional model of disability spanned from ancient history to the 18th century. In the traditional model, persons with disabilities where thought to be under the spell of witchcraft, possessed by demons or the victims of God’s punishment for their sins or the sins of their parents.

 

MEDICAL MODEL

The medical model of disability considered the person with a disability to be a problem. They were measured against a scale of what was known as normalcy. They were measured and considered only for what they could not do as opposed to what they could do.

 

SOCIAL MODEL

The Social model of disability is the modern view of persons with disabilities. The social model focuses on the strengths of individuals instead of their disabilities. Attention is given to lessening the barriers between them and living their lives in the best way possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SELF-DIRECTED MODEL

The self-directed model is a method of providing services for those with disabilities that allows the person with a disability or their representative, have direct control and responsibility of managing the services that are provided for them.

 

PERSON-CENTRED PLANNING VS INSTITUTIONALIZATION

One modern approach to planning the futures of people with disabilities is the person- centred approach. The person-centred approach focuses on the individual’s goals and desires and assist them in planning and carrying out an ongoing problem solving regime to achieve their goals. The traditional and medical models institutionalised individuals for an array of disabilities. Those individuals would be forced to spend the rest of their life in institutions with little or no control over what their lives were like while being held there.

 

WHAT IS DISABLITY

A disability is any condition that is constant in a person and restricts the person in some way in their everyday life.

The disability services Act 1993 explains disability in the following way:

The Disability Services Act (1993) defines ‘disability’ as meaning a disability: which is attributable to an intellectual, psychiatric, cognitive, neurological, sensory or physical impairment or a combination of those impairments which is permanent or likely to be permanent which may or may not be of a chronic or episodic nature Which results in substantially reduced capacity of the person for communication, social interaction, learning or mobility and a need for continuing support services.1

 

DISABILITY VARIATIONS

There are many different types of disability and these will affect people in a range of different ways. Disability is a personal and unique thing for each person that it affects and it is essential to ensure that all services and support that are offered to persons with are tailored specifically to each individual’s needs.

 

 

1 http://www.disability.wa.gov.au/understanding-disability1/understanding-disability/what-is- disability/

 

 

 

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CATERGORIES OF DISABLITY

The main categories that disability can be broken down into include:

 Physical

 Sensory

 Psychiatric

 Neurological

 Cognitive

 Intellectual

 Combinations of the above

 

TYPES OF DISABLITY

ACQUIRED BRAIN INJURY

Acquired brain injuries are very common in Australia and can impact on people in a range of different ways and with greatly varying severity. Acquired brain injury can alter the way that a person, thinks, behaves and acts.

Acquired brain injuries can be caused by a range of different factors including:

 Head trauma due to fall, severe shaking, car accident, bike accident and other

incidents that cause blows to the head

 Strokes

 Lack of oxygen to the brain caused by suffocation, electrocution, near-

drowning or heart failure

 Brain tumours

 Meningitis or encephalitis

 Infant alcohol or drug syndrome

 Lead poisoning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

Autism spectrum disorders vary greatly from person to person and are lifelong disorders.

Autism spectrum disorder may be identified by challenges for the person in the areas of:

 Non-verbal communication

 Friendship building

 Social and emotional development

 Language

 Participating in conversations

 

People on the autism spectrum may present a range of characteristics including:

 Repetitive behaviour

 Fixations

 Dysfunctional routines

 Sensory overload

 

Several different types of autism fall on the spectrum and these include:

 Autistic disorder

 Asperger’s

 Pervasive developmental disorder

 Retts

 Childhood Disintegrative disorder

 

COGNITIVE DISABILITY

Cognitive disabilities can be very broad in nature; some cognitive disorders are biological while others are psychological.

All cognitive disabilities involve the person experiencing difficulty in mental tasks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY

Developmental delays are a range of disorders that result in the person developing in physical, mental or emotional categories. This is a life-long and varied collection of disabilities that result from a lack of development in a variety of areas.

 

INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Intellectual disabilities are life-long and cannot be cured, they are a range of disabilities that are a caused by chromosomal defects that are present from birth. It is essential in the case of intellectual disabilities that the person is provided with appropriate resources and services in order to assist them to function within the bounds of their disability the best that they can.

 

NEUROLOGICAL IMPAIRMENT

Neurological impairment is a broad category of disabilities that takes in more than 600 different types of disabilities. Neurological impairment is a result of damage to the nervous system.

There are a range of different causes for this including:

 Presence at birth

 Injury

 Illness

 

Neuroglical disabilities occur when the nervous system is damaged; this includes damage to the brain and spinal cord. This causes issues to the communication that should be occurring between the brain and the body.

 

PHYSICAL DISABILITY

Physical disabilities are a variety of disabilities that place a range of limitations on the functioning, stamina, mobility or dexterity of a person’s physical performance. Some physical disabilities may limit other functions of the person’s body including, blindness, sleep disorders and respiratory disorders.

 

 

 

 

 

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SENSORY DISABILITY, INCLUDING HEARING, VISION IMPAIRMENT

There are a range of disabilities that affect the sensory systems of person’s body. These can be varied in their cause and in their effect.

Sensory disabilities include impairments to:

 Hearing

 Sight

In some cases a person may be suffering from dual sensory impairment meaning that the person will be dealing with both types of sensory impairment at once.

 

SPEECH/LANGUAGE DISABILITY

Speech and language disabilities are both involving the action of verbal communication and associated impairments or challenges.

When a person has a speech disability they will have trouble or not be able to make the necessary sounds required in order to speak fluently or clearly.

When a person has a language disability they will have difficulty in understanding or communicating, their thoughts, ideas and feelings.

 

LEGAL AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR WORKING WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY:

DISCRIMINATION

It is essential to ensure that the person with a disability is not discriminated against and receives the same level of care, choice and respect as any other person.

The Disability Discrimination Act must be adhered to at all times throughout service delivery and contact with the client.

 

DIGNITY OF RISK

Dignity of risk is the legal requirement to ensure that all persons with a disability has the legal right to choose their own medical treatments even if the professionals involved feel that this is not the correct choice for them.

 

 

 

 

 

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DUTY OF CARE

Duty of care is one’s legal obligation to take reasonable care to prevent others from being harmed. This means that if a worker identifies something that could reasonably be considered to be a risk, than the employee must, in response, take reasonable action to eliminate that risk. This means that if a client is presenting with indicators of harm it is important that these are responded to according to legal requirements and duty of care needs.

All relevant risk assessments, observation tools and activities should be carried out when any of these indicators are present. It is essential that when a client presents with a need for a particular service they will in fact be referred on to that service.

Legal requirements and duty of care obligations include:

 Ethical referral

 Comply with state and territory legislation

 

 

MANDATORY REPORTING

In addition to the general level of duty of care and ensuring that adult’s risks are minimised and managed it is important to keep in mind that in some instances such as when a child is presenting with indicators of harm, neglect, abuse or risk of harm that appropriate legal and ethical factors are considered.

Child protection requires knowledge of relevant state mandatory reporting legislation and its application. It will be necessary for all community services workers to ensure that they both know and comply with the legislation related to the reporting of these indicators in children for their jurisdiction.

 

PRIVACY, CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE

With regards to community service work, this is viewed in legal terms as the protection of personal information. In order for one to comply legally with regulations surrounding confidentiality, an individual is not permitted to share a client’s personal information with co-workers, third parties or even friends and family of the client. The legal exception to this rule is when sharing the information could prevent harm being done to the client or anyone in the greater community. There are many ways to keep information confidential. The following are examples of some of these methods:

 

 

 

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 individual files are locked and secured

 support workers do not tell other people what is in a client’s file unless they

have permission from the client

 information about clients is not told to people who do not need to know

 clients’ medical details are not discussed without their consent

 Adult clients have the right to keep any information about themselves

confidential, which includes that information being kept from family and

friends

 

WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

It is essential that all aspects of the Work Health and Safety Act are upheld at all times and that appropriate controls and steps are taken in order to effectively identify any hazards in the environment and to take appropriate measures to minimise, manage and report on them.

 

CODES OF CONDUCT

The disability codes of practice are put in place to ensure that all of the rights, needs and preferences of the client are upheld to the required standard at all times.

There are a range of codes of practice that may apply to the service delivery for people with a disability and these may include:

 Discrimination code of practice

 Disability code of practice

 Work health and safety codes of practice

 Community services codes of practice

 Ethical code of practice

 

 

WORK ROLE BOUNDARIES – RESPONSIBILITIES AND LIMITATIONS

It is essential that all disability personnel are clearly aware of their own roles and responsibilities in order to ensure that they are able to effectively work within them. It is also important that they are aware of their own professional boundaries and that

 

 

 

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these roles, responsibilities and boundaries must be clearly demonstrated and explained to the person with a disability in order to establish and maintain a professional, legal and ethical relationship with the person with a disability.

Work role boundaries, responsibilities and limitations may include:

 Agreed policies and procedures

 Scope of role

 Legal obligations

 Professional engagement with the client

 

INDICATORS OF ABUSE

It is important to remember that abuse can happen to any client regardless of their age, sex, culture, abilities or socio-economic background. There are many different types of abuse that you may either witness the signs of or see evidence of when working within community services. Each of the different types of abuse has different indicators that can assist in identifying them. As a community services worker you will need to have an understanding of what these different types of abuse can consist of and how to identify the signs that these different types of abuse may have.

 

FINANCIAL ABUSE

Financial abuse is a form of abuse where money is used as a tool to gain power and restrict the freedoms of a client. The client may report that their partner does not allow them to have any financial independence at all, does not allow the person to earn their own money and has extreme control over every dollar that the person has. You should look out for signs that this is occurring such as fear related to making financial decisions, fear in spending very small amounts of money, not having access to any money’s at all that are not provided by the partner.

 

NEGLECT

Is when a client is not given basic care or reasonable assistance as required, this can be with hygiene, food, refusal of much needed home care and leaving a person stranded or alone for long periods of time when they are not in a position to care for themselves. Neglect can be noticed in the person’s appearance and hygiene and in things that they say that may give away situations that should not have occurred.

 

 

 

 

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SEXUAL ABUSE

Examples of sexual abuse include forcing a person to have sex with their partner whenever they want and in the way that they want or threatening to have affairs is the partner does not want to have sex with them or withholding sex in a malicious way. Direct or indirect comments regarding these types of behaviours can be an indication of client sexual abuse. Client sexual abuse can also be inappropriate or illegal sex acts that are forced upon the client.

 

PHYSICAL ABUSE

Occurs when a client is physically harmed in a violent manner such as beating, forcibly restraining, slapping or injuring the person either deliberately or through continued negligence. Signs of physical abuse can be unexplained scars, marks, cuts, bruises or broken bones. Direct or indirect comments related to instances like this or shying away and flinching when another person moves suddenly or tries to touch the person.

 

EMOTIONAL ABUSE

Emotional abuse is a very damaging form of abuse and is often difficult to recognise. This can consist of verbal abuse, isolation, threats and intimidation. Signs that a client is being emotionally abused can be stress, poor self-esteem, depression, fear of the person performing the abuse, stress related health problems, withdrawal and loss of confidence and independence.

 

 

 

 

IDENTIFY WAYS SOCIETY CAN AFFECT THE LEVEL OF IMPAIRMENT EXPERIENCED BY A PERSON WITH DISABILITY

Community services workers need to have an understanding of the ways that society can affect the level of impairment experienced by people with disabilities.

It is important to remember that when a person with a disability has access to the required resources, aids, support and services that they are likely to be able to overcome many of the challenges that they face on a day to day basis.

 

 

 

 

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SOCIAL CONSTRUCTS OF DISABLITY

Social constructs of disability is a theory that is based on the fact that because society in fact creates disability themselves through the assumption that all people are able bodied and fully functioning. This assumption creates the disability by placing a range of barriers to the person with a disability from participating in society.

 

It is thought that these beliefs therefore are the cause of the disabling nature of the person’s physical or mental attributes and not necessarily the physical and mental attributes themselves.

 

It is important to consider this when providing service and support to a person with a disability in order to utilise the aides and resources that are available to the person with a disability in order to ensure that they are able to overcome these barriers that are placed on them by society.

 

It is important to remember that a person with a disability is able to lead a fully functioning and contributing life within society and it is important that steps are taken in order to effectively facilitate this.

 

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWING AND RESPECTING EACH PERSON AS AN INDIVIDUAL

SOCIAL JUSTICE

Social justice is the concept that all people deserve the same access and opportunity as each there and that disability is not a reason for this same treatment not being offered to a person with disability or for any other reason.

ACCESS AND EQUITY

Access and equity is the act of promoting fairness while distributing resources and opportunities, particularly to those in need. While working in community development, in order to adhere to the principles of access and equity, the following guidelines should be considered:

 Ensuring that individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are presented with information in manner which they can understand

 Provide material in multiple languages and provide a translator when possible

 

 

 

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 No one should be excluded from taking part or being employed by the organisation based on race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or country of birth

 Services should be designed and delivered on the basis of accessibility to all who qualify to use them

 Holding meetings and services in locations that have access for handicapped individuals

 Encourage members from diverse backgrounds to seek employment or use of services from the organisation.

THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWING AND RESPECTING EACH PERSON AS AN INDIVIDUAL

It is essential that all personnel believe and feel that each and every person with a disability is individual and unique in their own characteristics, personality and needs and that the factors and aspects of their disability and the ways that these factors impact on the person with the disability will also be unique in their nature and severity.

 

All disability personnel should ensure that they make all assessments, decisions and support provisions with the specific and individual aspects of each client’s circumstances are catered for at all times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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REFLECT ON PERSONAL VALUES AND ATTITUDES REGARDING DISABILITY AND ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR POTENTIAL IMPACT

WHEN WORKING IN DISABILITY CONTEXTS

Community service workers who work with individuals with disabilities should regularly reflect on their own personal values and attitudes regarding disability and acknowledge their potential to impact people with disabilities when in work contexts.

 

PERSONAL VALUES WHEN WORKING WITH PERSONS WITH A DISABLITY

It is essential that all workers with the disability and community services sectors are aware of their own personal values and beliefs in relation to people with a disability. It is essential that all of their own personal values and beliefs are upheld by the principles of the disability sector at all times.

 

When working with persons with a disability the personal values, attitudes and beliefs of a disability worker can be either a negative or positive factor in the service that they provide and it is essential to ensure that they are promoting the correct attitudes at all times.

 

When a worker does not have personal attitudes and beliefs that are in line with the principles of working with persons of disability this can impact on the client and therefore it is essential that these values attitudes and beliefs are able to be effectively managed at all times.

 

PRINCIPLES OF DISABLITY

Principles of disability include:

 Professional treatment

 The upholding of rights

 Self-determination

 Empowerment

 The uniqueness of each person

 The fact that a person with a disability can overcome all challenges required

with the correct support and service provision

 

 

 

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ETHICAL ISSUES

Issues concerning values of community service workers are considered to be ethical issues. Issues that may arise that involve a conflict between the value base and values of a worker and the value base of a worker are considered to be ethical dilemmas.

 

DEALING WITH ETHICAL DILEMMAS

Workers should have a course of action to dealing with ethical dilemmas. Some steps that can be taken to assist in resolving ethical dilemmas are:

 

1. Determine the organisations value base – Workers can consult the

organisations mission statement and other relevant document to accurately

determine their organisations value base.

2. Evaluation and consideration of workers own value base – Workers

should give serious consideration of their own value base to ensure that it is

congruent with that of the organisation by which they are employed

3. Determine if there is an ethical dilemma – An ethical dilemma exists when

there is a conflict between the workers values and those of the organisation

by which they are employed. These three conditions must be present in a

situation in order for it to be considered an ethical dilemma:

 The worker or “Agent” must be faced with a decision of a course of action in a

given situation.

 There must be several options to choose from

 No matter which course of action is taken both value base of the worker and

those of the organisation cannot both be upheld?

4. Resolve the dilemma – A choice of the available options must be made. The

worker may opt to give the responsibility to another to avoid having to make

the decision. Workers often have consultation with colleagues to assist them

with making a decision in the situation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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DEVELOP AND ADJUST OWN APPROACHES TO FACILITATE EMPOWERMENT

All community service workers should constantly develop and adjust their own approaches to facilitating services to their clients. This is especially true of workers approaches to empowering people with disabilities.

 

After a long history of misunderstanding, misdiagnosing and misrepresenting people with disabilities, society is finally starting to adopt more compassionate and effective approaches to interacting with people with disabilities.

 

Service workers have added legal, social and professional responsibilities toward disabled individuals.

 

PRINCIPLES OF EMPOWERMENT

Gaining independence is a very important aspect of empowerment for people living with a disability and this is a very important aspect of working with people with a disability. It is essential that a range of steps are taken that will assist in guiding and enabling choice and self-determination in a positive and supportive manner for the client at all times.

 

RIGHTS-BASED APPROACH

Rights based approaches in community service are focused on ensuring that all of the rights of all clients are upheld at all times. It is essential to ensure that all rights of the client are known, explained to the client and then upheld at all times.

 

METHODS TO DEVELOP AND ADJUST OWN APPROACHES

Community service workers can develop and adjust their own approaches in the many ways, including:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SEEKING FEEDBACK

Workers should seek feedback on their job performance, attitude toward specific job tasks or scenarios. They can seek feedback from supervisors, colleagues or appropriate outside organisations.

 

TAKING PART IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

It is essential that all disability personnel take part in a range of professional development activities in relation to different methods for encouraging and supporting the empowerment of persons with a disability.

 

TRAINING

There may be a range of training activities that personnel will be able to participate in, in order to ensure that their skills in relation to the empowerment of clients with a disability can be maintained.

Training in empowerment could include:

 Communication

 Disability support

 Methods for encouraging and supporting empowerment

 

SELF-REFLECTION

Self-reflection is an important learning and professional development opportunity for disability personnel and should be seen as both integral to quality service and a positive practice to be undertaken.

Self-reflection may include:

 Looking back on own performance

 Analysing all work practices and strategies

 Analysing learner feedback

 Analysing own responses to learners

 Considering situations that both worked and needed improvement

 Brainstorming for possible solutions

 Investigation of reasons for incidents

 Determining a range of improvements that could be made

 

 

 

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T O P I C 2 – F O S T E R H U M A N R I G H T S

ASSIST THE PERSON WITH DISABILITY TO UNDERSTAND THEIR RIGHTS

It is essential to ensure that the person with a disability is assisted appropriately in order to ensure that they understand their own rights.

 

UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (CRPD)

The CRPD is the first internal binding agreement to directly deal with the rights of people with disabilities. The CRPD was ratified in Australia in 2007. The primary purposes of the CRPD are to ensure that people with disabilities are allowed to have the same human rights as people without disabilities and the protection their dignity.

 

It is essential to ensure that all of the person’s human rights are respected and upheld at all times. All human rights legislation as well as the United Nations conventions on the rights of persons with a disability is respected and upheld. These treaties provide persons with a disability with a range of rights including, respect, dignity, self- determination and the right to choose what happens to them in their lives.

 

STRATEGIES THAT ASSIST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES TO EXERCISE THEIR RIGHTS AND SUPPORT

It is essential to develop a range of strategies that can encourage and develop independent action and thinking.

Strategies may include:

 Use of technology (e.g. laptops or tablets) to facilitate choice

 Communication

 Information sharing

 Handouts

 Presentations

 Explanations

 Communication aides

 

 

 

Developed by Enhance Your Future Pty Ltd 31 CHCDIS007 – Facilitate the empowerment of people with disability Version 2

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