HIST 2006 Week 11. Consumption and the Global Consumer Essay.

HIST 2006 Week 11. Consumption and the Global Consumer Essay.

Is globalisation linked to the emergence of global consumer products? Are these products
Western in nature and manufacturing? Is there a ‘global consumer’? What is the role of
businesses, the state and of people in shaping global consumption? Does the use of similar
commodities create uniformity across the globe? This week will focus on two global consumer
goods (clothing and food) in order to analyse the role of consumers, technologies, the meaning
of power and the creation of hybridity. HIST 2006 Week 11. Consumption and the Global Consumer Essay.

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Key Readings
Audrey Russek, “Appetites Without Prejudice: U.S. Foreign Restaurants and the Globalization of
American Food Between the Wars,” Food & Foodways, 19/1-2 (2011), pp. 34-55.*
Kaori O’Connor, “The King’s Christmas Pudding: Globalization, Recipes, and the Commodities of
Empire,” Journal of Global History, 4/1(2009), pp. 127-155.*
Wiley A., “Milk for ‘Growth’: Global and Local Meanings of Milk Consumption in China, India,
and the United States,” Food & Foodways, 19/1-2 (2011), pp. 11-33.*
Further Readings
David M. Andersen and Neil Carrier, “’Flowers of Paradise’ or ‘Polluting the Nation’? Contested
Narratives of Khat Consumption,” in John Brewer and Frank Trentmann, eds., Consuming
Cultures, Global Perspectives: Historical Trajectories, Transnational Exchanges (Oxford: Berg,
2006), pp. 145-166. HS 2000.C6
David Arnold, “Global Goods and Local Usages: The Small World of the Indian Sewing Machine,
1875–1952,” Journal of Global History, 6/3 (2011), pp. 407-429.*
Sarah Cheang, “Women, Pets, and Imperialism: The British Pekingese Dog and Nostalgia for Old
China,” Journal of British Studies, 45/2 (2006). pp. 359-387.*
Frank Dikötter, Things Modern: Material Culture and Everyday Life in China (London, 2007).
Antonia Finnane, Changing clothes in China: fashion, history, nation (London: Hurst & Company,
2007), esp. ch. 4 ‘Soldiers and Citizens’ GT 1555.F56*
Gina Hames, Alcohol in Global History (Basingstoke, 2012), esp. chs 6 ‘Imperialism and Alcohol’
and 7 ‘Alcohol and Globalisation’.
Matthew Hilton, “Consumer Movements,” in Frank Trentmann, ed., The Oxford Handbook of the
History of Consumption (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. 505-520.* HS 2000.O9
Karl Hagstrom Miller, “Talking Machine World: Selling the Local in the Global Music Industry,
1900-20,” in A. G. Hopkins, Global History: Interactions between the universal and the local
(Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2006), pp. 160-190.*
C. Jirousek, “The Transition to Mass Fashion System Dress in the Later Ottoman Empire,” in
Donald Quataert (ed.), Consumption Studies and the History of the Ottoman Empire, New York:
CUNY, 2000), pp. 201-41.*HIST 2006 Week 11. Consumption and the Global Consumer Essay.
27
J. Kaufman and O. Patterson, “Cross-National Cultural Diffusion: The Global Spread of Cricket,”
American Sociological Review, 70/1 (2005), pp. 82-110.*
Yavuz Koese, “Nestlé in the Ottoman Empire: Global Marketing with Local Flavor 1870–1927,”
Enterprise & Society 9/4 (2008), pp. 724-761.*
Naomi Klein, No Logo (New York, 2001), ch. 9 and conclusion (pp. 195-230 and 439-58).*
Jeremy Prestholdt, “Similitude and Empire: On Comorian Strategies of Englishness,” Journal of
World History, 18/ 2 (2007), pp. 113-138.*
Geoffrey Jones, “Blonde and blue-eyed? Globalizing Beauty, c.1945– c.1980,” Economic History
Review, 61/1 (2008), pp. 125-154.*
Erika Rappaport, A Thirst for Empire: How Tea Shaped the Modern World (Princeton, 2017).
Michael R. Redclift, “Chewing Gum: Mass Consumption and the ‘Shadow-lands’ of the Yucatan,”
in John Brewer and Frank Trentmann, eds., Consuming Cultures, Global Perspectives: Historical
Trajectories, Transnational Exchanges (Oxford: Berg, 2006), pp. 167-188. HS 2000.C6
Robert Ross, Clothing: A Global History, Or, The Imperialists’ New Clothes (Cambridge: Polity,
2009).
M. Sahlins, “Cosmologies of Capitalism: The Trans-Pacific Sector of “The World System”, in N.
Dirks, G. Eley and S. Ortner (eds.), Culture / Power / History: A Reader in Contemporary Social
Theory (Princeton, 1988).
Karen Tranberg Hansen, Salaula: the world of secondhand clothing and Zambia (Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, 2000), esp. ch. 4 ‘Dressing the New Nation’ HP 5464.H2*
A. Wiley, “Transforming Milk in a Global Economy,” American Anthropologist, 109/4 (2007), pp.
666-677.*
Verity Wilson, “Western Modes and Asian Clothing: Reflections on Borrowing Other People’s
Dress,” Costume, 36 (2002), pp. 139-56.*
W. Zelinsky, “Globalization Reconsidered: The Historical Geography of Modern Western Male
Attire,” Journal of Cultural Geography, 22/1 (2004), pp. 83-134.*
Essay Questions
Is ‘the consumer’ an invention of Western culture in the attempt to sell its products to the
world?
Consider one product or commodity and explain why it is/has become global.
‘Consumer movements and protests are among the most visible signs of globalisation’. Discuss
with reference to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.HIST 2006 Week 11. Consumption and the Global Consumer Essay.

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