Paper review

Paper review, writing homework help

Please I need you review the attached paper without changing the context.

– make sure the paper is APA style

– Reference is APA style

– send a turnitin report with 15 % or less similarity.

 

Executive summary

Disengaged employees and a high turnover rate impact your business’ productivity, level of innovation, and ultimately the bottom line. This white paper, discusses effective strategies and tactics that build a corporate culture of engagement:

  • Understand the benefits of having an engaged staff.
  • Avoid mistakes many companies make.
  • Learn specific tips for Individuals, Coworkers, Managers, the HR Department, and Senior Management

Why should managers and workers care about engagement? One reason is that high levels of employee engagement lead to lower turnover rates, since there is a close link between company image and individual selfeimage in highly engaging workplaces. Without close attachments to the workplace, people feel alienated and will usually seek greener pastures elsewhere. A second reason is that it just makes sense to conclude that workplaces in which employees have a high level of self-interest investedin the organization’s success will be highly productive, a fact that research supports (Globoforce Survey Results, 2007). A third reason is that a high engagement workplace is one in which people want to work and want to be highly involved because self-interest and organizational interest are closely aligned. A fourth reason is that, according to Gallup research, there is a high correlation between innovation and workplaces with high levels of engagement (Gallup Reveals the Formula for Innovation, 2007).

Introduction

Building a fully engaging workplace requires a change effort—an organizational development intervention—that is intended to build a new corporate culture. As in most organizational development interventions, organizational leaders should focus on building commitment by building involvement. They must sacrifice attention on getting results that they define to getting results that they and workers jointly define (Rothwell and Sullivan, 2005). The key is a focus on interpersonal relationships—how things are done and how people work together—rather than the shorter but less effective approach of dictating the outcomes desired.

Engaging employees in an organization is crucial to a business success today more than ever before. The traditional employee engagement is no longer effective in modern times. With the increase of employee dissatisfaction and high turnover, the organization needs to take measure that ensures that it does not only retain top performers but also engages the employees to participate in decision-making. Focusing on employee’s engagement aids the organization in maintaining a workforce that is motivated and willing to drive business goals. This white paper discusses effective measures which build a culture of engagement by identifying the benefit of engaging the staff, avoiding the mistake of using old traditional employee engagement methods and using more modern and dynamic positive employee engagement strategies.

Previous findings

What Research Indicates About Employee Engagement

According to Profiles International—Imagine Great People study, about $350 billion per year is lost because of employee disengagement. This $2.3 million study examined 8,000 employees in a cross-section of industries. The findings indicated that workers could reallybe classified into six major groups:

(Please put the stats below in a table)

  • Detached Contributors—15% (national average).

These people see the value of work for its near-term economic benefit.

  • Stalled Optimists—19% (national average). For this segment, work is

a source of livelihood but not yet (or not currently) a satisfying priority in their lives.

  • Maverick Contributors—15% (national average).

For Maverick Contributors, work is one of the multiple opportunities they have for change and excitement in their lives.

  • Self-Empowered Innovators—14% (national average).

To them, workis about creating something with lasting value beyond themselves.

  • Fair & Square Traditionalists—20% (national average).

Work isabout upward mobility—a predictable upward mobile path to success.

  • Accomplished Contributors—17% (national average).

For these people, work is an opportunity to be a valuable part of a winning team.

Managers play a major role in establishing and maintaining an engaging workplace. Building an engaging work climate is not something that the HR department does. Rather, managers play an active—and daily—role in the climate. If managers focus on the positive with their workers, they foster an engaging work climate. But if managers constantly criticize workers, micromanage what they do, and fail to recognize their efforts, then the managers’ behaviors swell the ranks of not engaged and actively disengaged workers.

Organizational Practices to Encourage Employee

Engagement Employee engagement programs are like other things: you get out of it what you put into it. If organizational leaders expect instant results from such programs, then they are pursuing a flavor of the month. True change requires long-term commitment to the effort. The evidence suggests that workers are growing increasingly cynical because they see their leaders too often saying one thing and doing another—and too often chasing fads and expecting instant gratification from them (Lines, 2005). Rather than point their fingers at workers alone, the leaders must first “walk the walk and talk the talk.” What managers do and how they behave sets the tone for employee engagement. The first lesson is that workers model their leaders’ behavior. If leaders are not fully engaged, workers will not be either. Managers must model the level of engagement they seek. And HR’s role is to serve as coach to managers when they do otherwise.

Figure 1 representing American employee’s engagement in 2015

Every element of the organization needs to be reconsidered for how much it fosters engagement. Managers and other organizational leaders should consider how workers are:

  • Recruited
  • Selected
  • Given feedback
  • Rewarded
  • Promoted
  • Recognized for accomplishments
  • Emotionally invested in the organization’s mission
  • Socially involved with peers
  • Included in a highly cohesive team
  • Socially involved with their immediate supervisor
  • Proud to recommend the organization’s products, services or

employment to others

  • Proud when the organizationis recognizedfor excellence Insight …

The evidence suggests that workers are growing increasingly cynical because they see their leaders too often saying one thing and doing another.

Three Major Pitfalls to Avoid When Trying to Increase Employee Engagement

Do Not Assume:

  1. This isan issue that can be handed off to the HR department without significant line management

involvement.

  1. That higher salaries alonewill increaseengagement.
  2. That employee work ethic, or lack of it, is theroot causeof problems with engagement. That amounts to blaming the worker rather than having management accept accountability to do something to improve engagement.

New Findings

Moving beyond Individual Engagement to Create a Corporate Culture of Engagement Individuals, coworkers, managers, HR departments, and top managers should be considered when attempting to build a climate of full engagement.

Engagement and the Individual

A common mistake that many managers make is to focus solely on what is wrong with individuals who demonstrate a lack of commitment. But, instead of doing that, they should instead ask, “Why are some people not engaged or actively disengaged?” Granted, there are occasions when lack of engagement is solely attributable to the individual. The person simply has a bad attitude or lacks awareness of what impact his or her contribution makes to other workers, the organization as a whole, customers, distributors, suppliers or the community. But the question to ask is this: Was the person hired that way, or did something happen in the organization that prompted that attitude? If the personwas hired thatway, the organization should revisit its recruitment and selection methods. Is any effort made to look for evidence of high engagement in the work history of job applicants? If the person was not hired that way, what experiences in the organization made him or her that way? How could the issues of those past experiences be addressed?

The individual who demonstrates full engagement will:

  • Emphasize the positive about the organization—what is going right
  • Look for occasions to say good things about the organization, manager, department or people
  • Volunteer for extra duties
  • Express approvalaboutwhat the organization is doing and why it is doing it
  • Speak highly of the organization to coworkers, friends, relatives, and members of the community

Effective Communications & Human Relations.” It builds effective interpersonal skills, essential to employee engagement.

Engagement and Coworkers

Peers play an important role in influencing the attitudes of their peers.

Human beings do sometimes exercise a herd instinct, and that instinct can be seen in the influence of peers.

The stories that workers tell about their supervisors, the organization, the customers, and important issues affecting the work setting (such as how pay raises are allocated, work is done, or the value of the work itself) can influence people from the first day on the job. If a new hire is paired up

with an actively disengaged worker, it should come as no surprise if the new hire comes to have a jaundiced view of the organization. For that reason, great care should be taken in how new hires are introduced to the workplace—and by whom.

Coworkers who demonstrate the right example of engagement will:

  • Ask questions about the person each day to show he or she cares
  • Listenforfeelings as well as facts—and follow up to show a willingness to help
  • Invite coworkers out for social occasions
  • Work for the inclusiveness of everyone rather than encouraging “cliques”
  • Stress the positive
  • Refuse to listen to self-deprecation and focus on what a new hire or other workers doright
  • Refuse to pass bad gossip about others

Figure 2.  Employee engagement according to demographics

Demographics also influence employees feeling of being involved in an organization. Employees between the ages of 18 to 40 are the most engaged employees in the organization. Employees who are between the age 40 and 49 are list engaged while those between 50 to 61 tends to be the most engaged employees.According to a report by Gallup business journal 2016, just 30% of American employees feel engaged. For most employee work is dispiriting, depleting experience and it keeps getting worse. The majority of the employee feels that work demands more of their time which exceeds their capacity thus draining of the much-needed energy required for nurturing their talent and utilizing skills. Also, employees feel that competition and the rise of digital technology add pressure to their work.

Engagement and the Manager

How managers behave impacts what employees feel. An employee’s attitude about the workplace and the organization is influenced dramatically by what his or her boss says and does.

If the immediate supervisor takes joy in workers’ accomplishments, emphasizes what is right, makes an effort to catch people doing something right and praise them for it, and regularly takes steps to recognize and fairly reward achievement, then workers will feel that theirefforts do matter. But if managers are distant, seldom straying from their offices or from meetings, and provide feedback only when it is negative, then the manager’s behavior is creating a toxic workplace rather than an

engaged workplace. Managers who build the right climate will:

  • Recruit and select people in part based on their track record of engagement with past employers
  • Ask questions about what people feel about the organization, work, customers and other key issues, and then take steps to remove barriers to results
  • Focus on identifying individual strengths and leveraging those to theadvantageof the individual, team, and organization
  • Recognize achievement rather than envying it or trying to steal the credit for it
  • Develop people for engagement as well as for knowledge and skills
  • Provide encouragement when people seem to be unhappy or disappointed.

Engagement and Top Managers

In a fully engaging workplace, top managers will fully support engagement. They will:

  • Role model what full engagement looks like
  • Find occasions to praise people for what they do right
  • Encourage individual and organizational development
  • Recognize achievements publicly
  • Discuss problems privately
  • Emphasize the positive
  • Provide the resources to make a planned engagementprogram happen
  • Personallydevote time and attention to encouraging engagement
  • Coach individuals who do not demonstrate behaviors that encourage engagement

A real goal of employee engagement should be to establish a joint organizational vision, excite people to realize that vision, explore practical ways to make that vision a reality, and work toward implementing that vision. This approach to organizational change is called appreciative inquiry or positive changetheory. Applying it to organizational and individual change is a way to move employee engagement from a dream to a reality.

Figure 3 shows the different tools help boost employee engagement and their levels of effectiveness.

Engagement and the Organization

Concerted action is required by the whole organization—not just individuals or isolated groups—to address engagement issues. It must be approached systematically as part of a “whole systems transformation effort” that tries to unleash individual, group and organizational engagement. Management’s role is to discover what disengages people and try to knock down those barriers—or perceptions of barriers. HR can facilitate the process, and individuals can accept responsibility to do soul-searching, find what will engage them more, and work to realize those goals.

A real goal of employee engagement should be to establish a joint organizational vision, excite people torealize that vision, explore practical ways to make that vision a reality, and work toward implementing that vision.

Conclusion

Engagement is not the latest fad. But it can become a fad if it is undertaken without role modeling what full engagement looks like and expecting instant results. Building a climate of engagement should be the focus. Individuals should not be held to blame; rather, an organization’s leaders should re-examine everything that the organization does to support full engagement and what has happened that may have contributed to alienation. By doing so, leaders will show their genuine commitment to engagement and will beeffective role models for it.

 

 

 

References

Crabtree, S. (2007). Getting personal in the workplace: Are negative relationships squelching productivity in your company? The Gallup Management Journal, download from http://www.govleaders.org/gallup_article_getting_personal.htm

Gallup Q12 Employee Engagement Dashboard—Monitoring Employee

Satisfaction via a Flash-based Scorecard (2007). Downloaded from

http://www.enterprise-dashboard.com/2006/03/13/a-gallup-q12-

employee-engagement-dashboard-monitoring-employee-satisfactionvia-a-flash-based-scorecard/

Gallup Reveals the Formula for Innovation. (2007, 10 May). The Gallup Management Journal, download from http://gmj.gallup.com/content/27514/Gallup-Reveals-the-Formula-forInnovation.aspx

Globoforce Survey Results: Engage Employees and Leave the Competition Behind. (2007, Oct. 1). Business Wire.

Lines, R. (2005). The structure and function of attitudes toward organizational change. Human Resource Development Review, 4(1), 8–32. Rothwell, W., and Sullivan, R. (2005). (Eds.). Practicing organization

development: A guide for consultants. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Executive summary

Disengaged employees and a high turnover rate impact your business’ productivity, level of innovation, and ultimately the bottom line. This white paper, discusses effective strategies and tactics that build a corporate culture of engagement:

  • Understand the benefits of having an engaged staff.
  • Avoid mistakes many companies make.
  • Learn specific tips for Individuals, Coworkers, Managers, the HR Department, and Senior Management

Why should managers and workers care about engagement? One reason is that high levels of employee engagement lead to lower turnover rates, since there is a close link between company image and individual selfeimage in highly engaging workplaces. Without close attachments to the workplace, people feel alienated and will usually seek greener pastures elsewhere. A second reason is that it just makes sense to conclude that workplaces in which employees have a high level of self-interest investedin the organization’s success will be highly productive, a fact that research supports (Globoforce Survey Results, 2007). A third reason is that a high engagement workplace is one in which people want to work and want to be highly involved because self-interest and organizational interest are closely aligned. A fourth reason is that, according to Gallup research, there is a high correlation between innovation and workplaces with high levels of engagement (Gallup Reveals the Formula for Innovation, 2007).

Introduction

Building a fully engaging workplace requires a change effort—an organizational development intervention—that is intended to build a new corporate culture. As in most organizational development interventions, organizational leaders should focus on building commitment by building involvement. They must sacrifice attention on getting results that they define to getting results that they and workers jointly define (Rothwell and Sullivan, 2005). The key is a focus on interpersonal relationships—how things are done and how people work together—rather than the shorter but less effective approach of dictating the outcomes desired.

Engaging employees in an organization is crucial to a business success today more than ever before. The traditional employee engagement is no longer effective in modern times. With the increase of employee dissatisfaction and high turnover, the organization needs to take measure that ensures that it does not only retain top performers but also engages the employees to participate in decision-making. Focusing on employee’s engagement aids the organization in maintaining a workforce that is motivated and willing to drive business goals. This white paper discusses effective measures which build a culture of engagement by identifying the benefit of engaging the staff, avoiding the mistake of using old traditional employee engagement methods and using more modern and dynamic positive employee engagement strategies.

Previous findings

What Research Indicates About Employee Engagement

According to Profiles International—Imagine Great People study, about $350 billion per year is lost because of employee disengagement. This $2.3 million study examined 8,000 employees in a cross-section of industries. The findings indicated that workers could reallybe classified into six major groups:

(Please put the stats below in a table)

  • Detached Contributors—15% (national average).

These people see the value of work for its near-term economic benefit.

  • Stalled Optimists—19% (national average). For this segment, work is

a source of livelihood but not yet (or not currently) a satisfying priority in their lives.

  • Maverick Contributors—15% (national average).

For Maverick Contributors, work is one of the multiple opportunities they have for change and excitement in their lives.

  • Self-Empowered Innovators—14% (national average).

To them, workis about creating something with lasting value beyond themselves.

  • Fair & Square Traditionalists—20% (national average).

Work isabout upward mobility—a predictable upward mobile path to success.

  • Accomplished Contributors—17% (national average).

For these people, work is an opportunity to be a valuable part of a winning team.

Managers play a major role in establishing and maintaining an engaging workplace. Building an engaging work climate is not something that the HR department does. Rather, managers play an active—and daily—role in the climate. If managers focus on the positive with their workers, they foster an engaging work climate. But if managers constantly criticize workers, micromanage what they do, and fail to recognize their efforts, then the managers’ behaviors swell the ranks of not engaged and actively disengaged workers.

Organizational Practices to Encourage Employee

Engagement Employee engagement programs are like other things: you get out of it what you put into it. If organizational leaders expect instant results from such programs, then they are pursuing a flavor of the month. True change requires long-term commitment to the effort. The evidence suggests that workers are growing increasingly cynical because they see their leaders too often saying one thing and doing another—and too often chasing fads and expecting instant gratification from them (Lines, 2005). Rather than point their fingers at workers alone, the leaders must first “walk the walk and talk the talk.” What managers do and how they behave sets the tone for employee engagement. The first lesson is that workers model their leaders’ behavior. If leaders are not fully engaged, workers will not be either. Managers must model the level of engagement they seek. And HR’s role is to serve as coach to managers when they do otherwise.

Figure 1 representing American employee’s engagement in 2015

Every element of the organization needs to be reconsidered for how much it fosters engagement. Managers and other organizational leaders should consider how workers are:

  • Recruited
  • Selected
  • Given feedback
  • Rewarded
  • Promoted
  • Recognized for accomplishments
  • Emotionally invested in the organization’s mission
  • Socially involved with peers
  • Included in a highly cohesive team
  • Socially involved with their immediate supervisor
  • Proud to recommend the organization’s products, services or

employment to others

  • Proud when the organizationis recognizedfor excellence Insight …

The evidence suggests that workers are growing increasingly cynical because they see their leaders too often saying one thing and doing another.

Three Major Pitfalls to Avoid When Trying to Increase Employee Engagement

Do Not Assume:

  1. This isan issue that can be handed off to the HR department without significant line management

involvement.

  1. That higher salaries alonewill increaseengagement.
  2. That employee work ethic, or lack of it, is theroot causeof problems with engagement. That amounts to blaming the worker rather than having management accept accountability to do something to improve engagement.

New Findings

Moving beyond Individual Engagement to Create a Corporate Culture of Engagement Individuals, coworkers, managers, HR departments, and top managers should be considered when attempting to build a climate of full engagement.

Engagement and the Individual

A common mistake that many managers make is to focus solely on what is wrong with individuals who demonstrate a lack of commitment. But, instead of doing that, they should instead ask, “Why are some people not engaged or actively disengaged?” Granted, there are occasions when lack of engagement is solely attributable to the individual. The person simply has a bad attitude or lacks awareness of what impact his or her contribution makes to other workers, the organization as a whole, customers, distributors, suppliers or the community. But the question to ask is this: Was the person hired that way, or did something happen in the organization that prompted that attitude? If the personwas hired thatway, the organization should revisit its recruitment and selection methods. Is any effort made to look for evidence of high engagement in the work history of job applicants? If the person was not hired that way, what experiences in the organization made him or her that way? How could the issues of those past experiences be addressed?

The individual who demonstrates full engagement will:

  • Emphasize the positive about the organization—what is going right
  • Look for occasions to say good things about the organization, manager, department or people
  • Volunteer for extra duties
  • Express approvalaboutwhat the organization is doing and why it is doing it
  • Speak highly of the organization to coworkers, friends, relatives, and members of the community

Effective Communications & Human Relations.” It builds effective interpersonal skills, essential to employee engagement.

Engagement and Coworkers

Peers play an important role in influencing the attitudes of their peers.

Human beings do sometimes exercise a herd instinct, and that instinct can be seen in the influence of peers.

The stories that workers tell about their supervisors, the organization, the customers, and important issues affecting the work setting (such as how pay raises are allocated, work is done, or the value of the work itself) can influence people from the first day on the job. If a new hire is paired up

with an actively disengaged worker, it should come as no surprise if the new hire comes to have a jaundiced view of the organization. For that reason, great care should be taken in how new hires are introduced to the workplace—and by whom.

Coworkers who demonstrate the right example of engagement will:

  • Ask questions about the person each day to show he or she cares
  • Listenforfeelings as well as facts—and follow up to show a willingness to help
  • Invite coworkers out for social occasions
  • Work for the inclusiveness of everyone rather than encouraging “cliques”
  • Stress the positive
  • Refuse to listen to self-deprecation and focus on what a new hire or other workers doright
  • Refuse to pass bad gossip about others

Figure 2.  Employee engagement according to demographics

Demographics also influence employees feeling of being involved in an organization. Employees between the ages of 18 to 40 are the most engaged employees in the organization. Employees who are between the age 40 and 49 are list engaged while those between 50 to 61 tends to be the most engaged employees.According to a report by Gallup business journal 2016, just 30% of American employees feel engaged. For most employee work is dispiriting, depleting experience and it keeps getting worse. The majority of the employee feels that work demands more of their time which exceeds their capacity thus draining of the much-needed energy required for nurturing their talent and utilizing skills. Also, employees feel that competition and the rise of digital technology add pressure to their work.

Engagement and the Manager

How managers behave impacts what employees feel. An employee’s attitude about the workplace and the organization is influenced dramatically by what his or her boss says and does.

If the immediate supervisor takes joy in workers’ accomplishments, emphasizes what is right, makes an effort to catch people doing something right and praise them for it, and regularly takes steps to recognize and fairly reward achievement, then workers will feel that theirefforts do matter. But if managers are distant, seldom straying from their offices or from meetings, and provide feedback only when it is negative, then the manager’s behavior is creating a toxic workplace rather than an

engaged workplace. Managers who build the right climate will:

  • Recruit and select people in part based on their track record of engagement with past employers
  • Ask questions about what people feel about the organization, work, customers and other key issues, and then take steps to remove barriers to results
  • Focus on identifying individual strengths and leveraging those to theadvantageof the individual, team, and organization
  • Recognize achievement rather than envying it or trying to steal the credit for it
  • Develop people for engagement as well as for knowledge and skills
  • Provide encouragement when people seem to be unhappy or disappointed.

Engagement and Top Managers

In a fully engaging workplace, top managers will fully support engagement. They will:

  • Role model what full engagement looks like
  • Find occasions to praise people for what they do right
  • Encourage individual and organizational development
  • Recognize achievements publicly
  • Discuss problems privately
  • Emphasize the positive
  • Provide the resources to make a planned engagementprogram happen
  • Personallydevote time and attention to encouraging engagement
  • Coach individuals who do not demonstrate behaviors that encourage engagement

A real goal of employee engagement should be to establish a joint organizational vision, excite people to realize that vision, explore practical ways to make that vision a reality, and work toward implementing that vision. This approach to organizational change is called appreciative inquiry or positive changetheory. Applying it to organizational and individual change is a way to move employee engagement from a dream to a reality.

Figure 3 shows the different tools help boost employee engagement and their levels of effectiveness.

Engagement and the Organization

Concerted action is required by the whole organization—not just individuals or isolated groups—to address engagement issues. It must be approached systematically as part of a “whole systems transformation effort” that tries to unleash individual, group and organizational engagement. Management’s role is to discover what disengages people and try to knock down those barriers—or perceptions of barriers. HR can facilitate the process, and individuals can accept responsibility to do soul-searching, find what will engage them more, and work to realize those goals.

A real goal of employee engagement should be to establish a joint organizational vision, excite people torealize that vision, explore practical ways to make that vision a reality, and work toward implementing that vision.

Conclusion

Engagement is not the latest fad. But it can become a fad if it is undertaken without role modeling what full engagement looks like and expecting instant results. Building a climate of engagement should be the focus. Individuals should not be held to blame; rather, an organization’s leaders should re-examine everything that the organization does to support full engagement and what has happened that may have contributed to alienation. By doing so, leaders will show their genuine commitment to engagement and will beeffective role models for it.

 

 

 

References

Crabtree, S. (2007). Getting personal in the workplace: Are negative relationships squelching productivity in your company? The Gallup Management Journal, download from http://www.govleaders.org/gallup_article_getting_personal.htm

Gallup Q12 Employee Engagement Dashboard—Monitoring Employee

Satisfaction via a Flash-based Scorecard (2007). Downloaded from

http://www.enterprise-dashboard.com/2006/03/13/a-gallup-q12-

employee-engagement-dashboard-monitoring-employee-satisfactionvia-a-flash-based-scorecard/

Gallup Reveals the Formula for Innovation. (2007, 10 May). The Gallup Management Journal, download from http://gmj.gallup.com/content/27514/Gallup-Reveals-the-Formula-forInnovation.aspx

Globoforce Survey Results: Engage Employees and Leave the Competition Behind. (2007, Oct. 1). Business Wire.

Lines, R. (2005). The structure and function of attitudes toward organizational change. Human Resource Development Review, 4(1), 8–32. Rothwell, W., and Sullivan, R. (2005). (Eds.). Practicing organization

development: A guide for consultants. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.