Patterning recognition and creation

Patterning recognition and creation, writing homework help

This discussion could be very simple not to elaborate and could be between 200 to 250 words.

Patterns are all around us. I encourage you to learn a little more about patterns and list 5 patterns you discovered that exist naturally within our lives/environment. You are responsible for posting your response to the question no later than Friday night midnight. Additionally you must respond to two other classmates before Sunday midnight.You must first post before being able to respond to others.

Patterning recognition and creation

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Understanding patterns is an underlying theme in preschool and kindergarten math lessons. A pattern is defined as any sequence that repeats at least twice. As a practical example, consider counting from one to one hundred by ones. When counting, there is a recurring pattern in which all digits rotate from 0 to 9 before restarting back at 0.

The first pattern that is introduced in the preschool classroom is called an AB pattern. This means that two different objects line up in an alternating pattern, such as: orange (A), banana (B), orange (A), banana (B), and so on.

As comfort with patterns grows, the patterns will become more complex, moving to an ABC pattern or an AAB pattern.

The ability to recognize, identify and create patterns not only supports learning in math but it also contributes to broader social development. Through an understanding of patterns, children are able to make predictions about what comes next. Just as a child can predict that a red bead will come next after seeing a string with a red bead, blue bead, green bead, red bead, blue bead, green bead pattern, a child will be able to make accurate predictions about other things or events that occur with regularity. For example, predicting what comes next after eating lunch (cleaning up) or after taking a bath (putting on clean clothes) will help a child maneuver more confidently in his environment.

JUST FOR FUN. CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW AND WATCH THIS LITTLE GUY DEMONSTRATE HIS UNDERSTANDING OF PATTERNS. FIRST HE SHOWS HOW PATTERNS CAN BE BOTH UP AND DOWN. THEN THE TEACHER SHOWS HIM HOW THEY CAN INVOLVE COLORS. DID YOU NOTICE ON THE WEBSITE HOW THEY LIST TWO BIG IDEAS? I ALSO APPRECIATE HOW THEY MENTION THAT THE VIDEOS ARE TAKEN FROM ONE-ON-ONE INTERVIEWS WITH INDIVIDUAL CHILDREN. ACCORDING TO THEIR SITE, “THESE INTERVIEWS ARE DESIGNED TO ELICIT EVIDENCE OF CHILDREN’S MATHEMATICAL THINKING.” THEY ARE NOT TEACHING EPISODES OR FORMAL ASSESSMENTS. Repeating Patterns with Child 32 – Erikson Institute Early Math Collaborative. (2013, March 3). Retrieved October 23, 2015.

http://earlymath.erikson.edu/repeating-patterns-with-child-32/

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