Rose lets his readers know a lot about the personal lives of Marita and Lucia

Rose lets his readers know a lot about the personal lives of Marita and Lucia. At times, it’s difficult not to let your knowledge of their family troubles or high school experiences influence any sympathy you have for them. And, of course, being sympathetic has its virtues since it permits you to understand how the two students Rose discusses found themselves in the kind of trouble they were in at the university. But if that sympathy is to prove useful, one should be able to move from that sympathy to recommendations that might address the harmful influences on the lives of Marita and Lucia. In Rose’s view, for example, is there anything that classroom instructors can do to help overcome Marita’s or Lucia’s disadvantaged background? If not instructors, then is Rose offering advice to other counselors about what to do with someone like Lucia? What if Rose’s background, instead of being in psychology, was in math? As far as we can tell from his description of their exchanges in his office, would he have been able to help Marita as he apparently did?

Some students frequently interpret the chapter from the book by McGrath and Spear as either recommending that community college faculty simply get “tougher” with wayward and obnoxious students, or as a kind of handbook for wayward students that might advise them to “straighten up and fly right.” Do either of those understandings of their chapter appear right to you? How would someone move from the details of community college students presented by M&S to one or the other of those two positions?

These are both separate readings and questions, not from the same articles. Each has to be 400 words I will let you know which one is which.