Week 5. Human Movements: Migrations, Diasporas and Global Communities Essay.

Week 5. Human Movements: Migrations, Diasporas and Global Communities Essay.

Why do people migrate? How important is the movement of people in connecting the world?
Can we see trends or phases of migration since 1750? Where do people move from and to?
Who is a migrant and why are migrant communities so important? Which are the social and
economic consequences of migration? Is migration more important now or in the past? Why do
states apply restrictive policies on migration?
Key Readings
Adam McKeown, ‘Different Transitions: Comparing China and Europe, 1600–1900’, Journal of
Global History, 6/2 (2011), pp. 309-19.*

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

Order Paper Now

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER HERE

Giovanni Gozzini, “The global system of international migrations, 1900 and 2000: a comparative
approach,” Journal of Global History 1/3 (2006), pp 321-341.*
A reading of your choice from the reading list. You might wish to consider one problem (forced
migration, refugees, etc.), one aspect (for instance gender; labour; legislation), a period (post
1990 or pre-1800).Week 5. Human Movements: Migrations, Diasporas and Global Communities Essay.
A. Segal, An Atlas of International Migration (London: Hans Zell, 1993). Handout
Other readings
Wanni W. Anderson, Robert G. Lee, eds., Displacements and Diasporas: Asians in the Americas
(Rutgers University Press, 2005). E 29.A75
S. Castels and S. J. Miller, The Age of Migration (New York and London, 1998). HC 2000.C2
B.R. Chiswick and T.J. Hatton, “International Migration and the Integration of Labor Markets,” in
M.D. Bordo, A.M. Taylor, and J.G. Williamson, eds., Globalization in Historical Perspective
(Chicago, 2003), pp. 65-117. Online
R. Cohen, ed., The Cambridge Survey of World Migration (Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, 1995), esp. pp. 141-156.* HC 2000.C2
R. Cohen, “Diaspora, the Nation State, and Globalization,” in B. Mazlish and A. Iriye, eds., Global
History Reader (New York, 2004), pp. 92-101. D 842.M37
R. Cohen, Global Diasporas: An Introduction (London, 2nd ed. 2008), esp. ch. 8 (pp. 141-158). HC
2000.C6
P.C. Emmer, and M. Morner, eds., European Expansion and Migration: Essays on the
Intercontinental Migration from Asia, Africa and Europe (Oxford: Berg, 1992). HC 2020.E8
David Eltis, ed., Coerced and Free Migration. Global Perspectives (Stanford: Stanford University
Press, 2002). HC 2000.C6
D.R. Gabaccia and D. Hoerder, eds., Connecting Seas and Connected Ocean Rims: Indian, Atlantic
and Pacific Oceans and China Seas Migration from the 1830s to the 1930s (Leiden and Boston,
2011), esp. D. R. Gabaccia and D. Hoerder, ‘Editors’ Introduction’, pp. 1-11 and D. R. Gabaccia,
‘Afterwards: Migration and Globalization: Bridging Three Eras in Modern World History’, pp.
492-506.
16
D. R. Gabaccia, ‘Afterwards: Migration and Globalization: Bridging Three Eras in Modern World
History’, in D. R. Gabaccia and D. Hoerder, eds., Connecting Seas and Connected Ocean Rims:
Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and China Seas Migration from the 1830s to the 1930s
(Leiden and Boston, 2011), pp. 492-506.
J.D. Gould, “European Inter-continental Emigration, 1815-1914: Patterns and Causes,” Journal of
European Economic History, 8/3 (1979), pp. 593-679. Soc. Science Journals
J.D. Gould, “European International Emigration: The Role of ‘Diffusion’ and ‘Feedback’,” Journal
of European Economic History, 9/2 (1980), pp. 267-315. Soc. Science Journals
Carolus Grütters, Sandra Mantu, and Paul Minderhoud, Migration on the Move: essays on the
dynamics of migration (Leiden and Boston, 2017). KW83.1.M54
Wang Gungwu, “Migration and Its Enemies,” in Bruce Mazlish and Akira Iriye, eds., Global
History Reader (New York, 2004), pp. 104-14. D 842.M37
T.J. Hatton and J.G. Williamson, The Age of Mass Migration. Causes and Economic Impact
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998). JV6217 .H37
T.J. Hatton and J.G. Williamson, “International Migration in the Long-Run: Positive Selection,
Negative Selection and Policy, NBER Working Paper 10529 (2004).*
D. Hoerder, Cultures in Contact: World Migration in the Second Millennium (Durham and
London, 2002), pp. 508-63 plus notes. HC 2000.H6
D. Hoerder, ‘Migration and Belonging’, in Emily S. Rosenberg, ed., A World Connecting (Harvard
University Press, 2012), pp. 435-591.
R. Lohrman, “Migrants, Refugees, and Insecurity. Current Threats to Peace?,” International
Migration, 38/4 (2000), pp. 3-22.*
J. Lucassen and L. Lucassen, eds., Migration, Migration History, History. Old Paradigms and New
Perspectives (Bern, 1997). HC 2000.L8
J. Lucassen, L. Lucassen and P. Manning, ‘Migration History: multidisciplinary approaches’, in J.
Lucassen, L. Lucassen and P. Manning, eds., Migration history in World History: multidisciplinary
approaches (Leiden and Boston, 2010), pp. 3-20. HC 2000.M44
P.L. Martin and J.F. Hollinfield, eds., Controlling Immigration. A Global Perspective (Stanford:
Stanford University Press, 1994). JV6271 .C66 and HC 2210.C6
J. McDonald and R. Schlomowitz, “Mortality on Immigrant Voyages to Australia in the
Nineteenth Century,” Explorations in Economic History, 27/1 (1990), pp. 84-113.*
Adam McKeown, ‘All that is Molten freezes Again: Migration History, Globalization, and the
Politics of Newness’, in Bryan S. Turner, ed., The Routledge International Handbook of
Globalization Studies (Abingdon, 2010), pp. 162-181. JE 120.G5 and EBook
Adam McKeown, ‘A World Made Many: Integration and Segregation in Global Migration, 1840-
1940’, in D.R. Gabaccia and D. Hoerder, eds., Connecting Seas and Connected Ocean Rims:
Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and China Seas Migration from the 1830s to the 1930s
(Leiden and Boston, 2011), pp. 42-64.
Kevin H. O’Rourke and Jeffrey G. Williamson, Globalization and History: the evolution of a
nineteenth-century Atlantic economy (Harvard: MIT Press, 2000), esp. chs. 7 and 8 (pp. 119-166)
and 10 (pp. 185-206) HY 4060.O7
17
W. Nugent, Crossings. The Great Transatlantic Migrations, 1870-1914 (Bloomington: Indiana
University Press, 1992). JV6465 .N84
A. Segal, An Atlas of International Migration (London: Hans Zell, 1993).* HC 2000 I6 Reference.
T. Sowell, Migration and Cultures. A World View (New York, 1996).Week 5. Human Movements: Migrations, Diasporas and Global Communities Essay.
P. Stalker, Workers without Frontiers. The Impact of Globalization on International Migration
(London, 2000). HM 1450.S8
A. Timmer, J.G. Williamson, “Immigration Policy prior to the Thirties: Labor Markets, Policy
Interactions, and Globalisation Backlash,” Population and Development Review, 24/4 (1998), pp.
739-771.*
V. Yans-McLaughlin, eds., Immigration Reconsidered: History, Sociology and Politics (New York:
Oxford University Press, 1990). E 184.A1
H. Zlotnik, “Trends of International Migration since 1965: What Existing Data Reveal,”
International Migration, 37/1 (1999), pp. 21-61.*
Essay Questions
Compare the migration experience of one national/ethnical group to two different areas of the
world.Week 5. Human Movements: Migrations, Diasporas and Global Communities Essay.
During the past two centuries the Atlantic has been the main stage for global migration. Discuss.
In what ways is migration in the period 1870-1914 different /similar to migration in the period
1970-2014?

The post Week 5. Human Movements: Migrations, Diasporas and Global Communities Essay. appeared first on Online Nursing Essay.